Easy DIY Wood Storage Cabinet


Any easy to make storage cabinet using pocket hole joinery. A simple weekend project.
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Credits———————————–
Music – Waylight Music –

All sound FX – freesound.org (all public domain)

Project info ——————————-
This project was created with the following materials/tools:
Pine 1 x lumber
Hardboard
Hinges
Hardboard panels
Pocket screws

Episode Notes:

The whole build started out with a few pieces of standard 1x pine boards.

First I marked out and cut the pieces I would need for each shelf.

For this cabinet there are 8. Seven actual shelves and the top.

After I had the proper length cut for each one, I headed over to the table saw and ripped each piece down ¼ inch shorter than each of the sides would be to allow for the back panel later on.

Using a circular saw, I cut some off the side of each board that would be the side to bring it down to the dimension I wanted. I also cut them to length on the miter saw.

Once I had everything cut for the shell of the cabinet, I started the task of drilling all of the pocket holes. I laid these out with equal spacing so they would look somewhat nice when the cabinet was opened, especially since I wasn’t planing on filling in the holes.

After all the holes were drilled I did the most exciting part of the project. I only sanded the side opposite of the pocket holes though. It saved both time and my sanity. I also hit the front edges as well.

The next step was to mark out where each shelf would go. This is fairly quick work of you measure out each shelf and then pencil your lines on with a square.

Now that all the holes are drilled and the marks are drawn you can start screwing the shelves to the sides. I started out by attaching all the shelves to one side. After I had all of those attached, I moved what I had assembled, flipped it and sat it back down on the opposite side. Since both sides are marked the same, this makes it incredibly easy to line up.

Next, I flipped the cabinet on its face and added a ¼ inch deep rabbet around the inside edge of each side to allow it to receive the back panels.

The back panels I used were some ¼ inch thick harboard panels that I had gotten from an old building I recently helped renovate. Before nailing them down, I measured to make sure everything was square and then fastened them down with some brads.

Since these did come from an old building, I sanded down the back of the panels to remove some of the coal dust that was caked into the fibers.

I also made two pieces for the front of the cabinet that would set above and below the doors. To make them look a little nicer, I put chamfer on the edges. Then I glued and nailed them in place.

The last thing to construct was the cabinet doors. The doors I settled on were simple and were assembled with butt joints, glue and you guessed it, more pocket screws.

So they would match the top and bottom plates of the cabinet, I added the same chamfer around the outside edges of the doors, but I left the inside edges how they were.

… read more about this project on our website. Link at the top of the description.